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Modifying a custody agreement

On Behalf of | Mar 8, 2022 | Child Custody

Parents in Maryland only want the best for their children. However, there are times when you might need to request modifications to your original custody agreement.

One parent has moved

If one parent has moved out of state or even to a city that’s very far away, the court will consider modifying the child custody order. It’s helpful if the parents have communicated with one another about a solution that could work for everyone with a new visitation schedule.

A parent’s situation has changed

Parents aren’t perfect, which means their situation can change for the better or worse. If one parent has a problem such as a drug or alcohol abuse, the custody agreement might need modifications. The court might revoke custody until the person gets rehab treatment or require supervised visitation. If the parent is incarcerated, modifications are also needed to the custody order.

One parent has died

If one of the parents has died, the court would have to modify the child custody order. If the parent who passed was the custodial one, the court must consider whether it’s in the child’s best interests to give the non-custodial parent full custody or if someone else should get it.

The child is in danger

If a parent with custody has a history of domestic violence against their former spouse or the child, it warrants child custody modification. When the child is in immediate danger, the court will quickly act to ensure that they are taken out of a potentially dangerous situation. The court will also listen to the child if they express fear or refuse to be in the home with that parent.

These are all valid reasons for modifications to a child custody order. The court takes these situations seriously.

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