When people think of an ex-spouse paying alimony, it is sometimes easy to assume the man is the one paying the price. Stereotypical thoughts aside, this outdated perception is not so outdated, after all.

According to a St. Louis Federal Reserve report, married men are far outpacing single men and their female counterparts in wages and salary. The data suggests married life offers exclusive financial benefits for the male spouse, but not so much for the wife.

This report may show that men who earn higher are more likely to get married, compared to men lower on the income ladder. The gender wage gap could also be a factor, however, that topic is full of complications.

Income ties in with alimony

There are several types of alimony in Maryland, which include:

  • Temporary: Alimony lasts only during divorce proceedings
  • Short-term: Alimony lasts a limited time, usually while the other spouse adjusts to their new financial situation
  • Long-term: Also known as permanent alimony, for when a spouse is unable to become self-supporting due to age, disability or illness

In most cases, there are similar factors that the courts consider in awarding alimony, such as:

  • Length of marriage
  • Standard of living
  • Financial needs
  • Ability to self-support
  • Contribution to marriage
  • Mental and physical condition

Adding on to the above factors, the court will also review who was at fault for the deteriorating marriage. The court may consider a spouse at fault if they committed adultery, abuse or abandoned the other spouse. When calculating the amount of support, the court looks at each spouse’s income, monthly expenses and investments.

Altogether, gender roles and income plays a large part in deciding who pays alimony. In some unique cases, a woman will pay alimony if she worked while the husband stayed at home with the children.